Packard Foundation

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The David and Lucile Packard Foundation is an aggressive left-wing foundation incorporated by David Packard, one of the Hewlett-Packard electronics company co-founders.

The Foundation, which was financed initially with the Packard family’s wealth, has grown into a preeminent anti-industry foundation, spending millions to impact timber harvesting, mining, commercial fishing and oil and gas operations. Most controversially, Packard finances seminars designed to train scientists in policy advocacy, hiring noted journalists, supportive of a progressive agenda, as teachers.This program is largely responsible for ensuring cross-specialty fluency in “climate activism” talking points.

Packard’s current top priority is an anti-industry project titled, “Conservation and Science – Climate, Land, Oceans,” according to Foundation Search.

Money

  • Tax status: Packard Foundation, 501(c)(3) private foundation that generates income by investing its initial endowment and disburses portions of its investment income each year as grants to selected recipients. It can also accept contributions from family, friends and other foundations.

2013 Financials

  • Packard financial assets: $6,902,501,278 (ledger value)
  • Packard total income: $2,161,342,538
  • Packard investment portfolio income $374,835,199.
  • Packard grants given $295,015,266
  • Packard travel, conferences, and meetings $3,440,423
  • Packard officer and director compensation $3,673,036
  • Packard employee compensation $15,940,110.

Source: IRS Forms 990 and the Foundation Search databank

Power

Paid Congressional Junkets

Packard Foundation funded 12 congressional trips, total cost $11,835

  • Cameron Arterton, staffer of Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX), traveled to Puerto Viejo de Sarapiquí, Costa Rica, to attend a course at La Selva Biological Station on carbon sequestration in tropical forests and the role of tropical forests in combating climate change, from October 10 to October 27, 2009 at a cost of $649.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Casey B.Fromson, staffer of Rep. Anna Eshoo, (D-CA), traveled same as above, from October 10 to October 13, 2009 at a cost of $1,175.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Katie Lassiter, staffer of Rep. Brian Baird, (D-WA), traveled same as above, from October 10 to October 13, 2009 at a cost of $675.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Ali Nouri, staffer of Sen. Jim Webb, (D-VA), traveled same as above from October 10 to October 13, 2009 at a cost of $672.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Alex Barron, staffer of Rep. Henry Waxman, (D-CA) ), traveled same as above from August 30 to September 2, 2009 at a cost of $668.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Kathleen Quint Black, staffer of Sen. Olympia Snowe, (R-ME) traveled same as above from August 30 to September 2, 2009 at a cost of $677.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Jim Greene, staffer of Sen. Ted Kaufman, (D-DE) traveled same as above. Traveled at personal expense on Aug. 29-30 and Sept. 2-5 at a cost of $677.00 reimbursed by the Packard Foundation.
  • Will Niebling, staffer of Sen. Ted Kaufman, (D-DE) traveled same as above from August 30 to September 2, 2009 at a cost of $668.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Joel Christopher Beauvais, staffer of Rep. Ed Markey, (D-MA) traveled same as above from August 29 to September 2, 2009 at a cost of $787.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Cecile Richards, staffer of Rep. Nancy Pelosi, (D-CA), traveled to Oakland, CA for a meeting with Foundation on domestic policy issues from June 4 to June 5, 2003, at a cost of $636.83 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Cassie Bevan, staffer of Rep. Bill Archer, (R-TX) traveled to Santa Cruz, CA to attend and participate in a meeting on the Adoption and Safe Families Act from June 7 to June 9, 2000 at a cost of $2,400.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.
  • Barbara Pryor, staffer of Sen. Jay Rockefeller, (D-WV) traveled to San Jose, CA to attend the meeting on implementation of the Adoption and Safe Families Act from June 7 to June 9, 2000 at a cost of $2,160.00 paid by the Packard Foundation.

Source: Legistorm

Revolving Door into Congressional Staff Positions

Former Packard Foundation lobbyist who took the revolving door into a congressional staff position:

  • Catharine Cyr Ransom worked for Max Baucus (D-MT), Senate Finance Committee.

Source: Legistorm

Network Interactions

See the Packard Foundation Muckety Map for an interactive view of the foundation’s vast social network.

Other current Packard Foundation relationships 2016:

Link takes you to the Muckety Map of the Energy Foundation consortium including the Packard Foundation and the entire vast social network:

Energy Foundation – partner

Money In – Grants received by Packard Foundation

The Packard Foundation has received 66 grants from 24 foundations totaling $8,297,634 between 1998 and 2016. The top 15 anti-industry donors:

  1. COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SANTA CRUZ COUNTY $1,937,663
  2. HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $1,450,000
  3. ALASKA CONSERVATION FOUNDATION $1,045,450
  4. HUMBOLDT AREA FOUNDATION $440,200
  5. NEW MEXICO COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $425,000
  6. WILLIAM & FLORA HEWLETT FOUNDATION $400,000
  7. NATIONAL GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES $350,192
  8. COMMUNITY FOUNDATION FOR MONTEREY COUNTY $275,970
  9. SONORA AREA FOUNDATION $275,000
  10. COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF THE NAPA VALLEY $250,000
  11. SOLANO COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $225,000
  12. EAST BAY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $180,000
  13. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $155,000
  14. SACRAMENTO REGION COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $148,000
  15. EL DORADO COMMUNITY FOUNDATION $125,000

Source: IRS Forms 990 and the Foundation Search databank

Money Out – Grants given by Packard Foundation

The Hewlett Foundation has paid 16,494 grants to 4,177 recipients totaling $4,243,757,051 between 1998 and 2016. The top 25 most anti-industry recipients:

  1. MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM RESEARCH INSTITUTE (MBARI) $456,149,877
  2. CLIMATEWORKS FOUNDATION $245,307,793
  3. RESOURCES LEGACY FUND $143,896,205
  4. CLIMATE WORKS FOUNDATION $73,800,000
  5. NATURE CONSERVANCY $71,442,861
  6. ENERGY FOUNDATION $70,664,800
  7. PENINSULA OPEN SPACE TRUST $51,768,442
  8. MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM FOUNDATION $51,377,095
  9. WORLD WILDLIFE FUND $38,182,804
  10. ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENSE FUND $23,129,843
  11. TIDES CENTER $15,408,894
  12. POPULATION COUNCIL $14,983,921
  13. TIDES CANADA FOUNDATION $13,845,658
  14. MARINE STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL $13,623,625
  15. NEW VENTURE FUND $13,225,110
  16. POPULATION ACTION INTERNATIONAL $12,878,000
  17. TRUST FOR CONSERVATION INNOVATION $10,612,312
  18. NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY $8,377,575
  19. OCEAN CONSERVANCY $7,474,000
  20. NATIONAL FISH AND WILDLIFE FOUNDATION $7,403,671
  21. ASPEN INSTITUTE $7,365,014
  22. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY $9,946,969
  23. MERIDIAN INSTITUTE $9,895,478
  24. ISLAND CONSERVATION AND ECOLOGY GROUP $6,937,431
  25. ELKHORN SLOUGH FOUNDATION $6,905,500

Source: IRS Forms 990 and the Foundation Search databank

Background & History

The Packard Foundation was founded by David Packard, co-founder of the Hewlett-Packard Company and pioneer of Silicon Valley technology leadership. Packard was a staunch conservative Republican who served as U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense from 1969–1971 during the Nixon administration.

He uncharacteristically supported population control in developing countries, particularly making abortions available for teen pregnancies, and advocated an early version of climate change controls. He had grown up fishing the waters of Monterey Bay, and his daughters Nancy Packard Burnett and Julie Packard were educated as marine biologists – and zealous environmentalists.

Marine life was a family fixation. The two daughters easily convinced their parents to create the Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation in 1978 and donate $55 million to build a new aquarium, which opened in 1984 with Julie Packard as executive director. Three years later, David Packard gave $13 million to create the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, run by son David. These institutions were intended as both as safe habitats for ocean creatures, and as instruction tools, teaching people to see and care for aquatic habitats – and oppose commercial fisheries, which they defined as a major threat to ocean life. That project continues as “Seafood Watch.”

The four Packard children, David, Nancy, Susan, and Julie, learned about foundations and grant-making as they grew up and were invited onto the board of directors at age 21. They were well equipped to take over.

David Packard died on March 26, 1996 at age 83. He left the bulk of his estate, over $6 billion, to the family Foundation, and had pre-appointed his daughter Susan Packard Orr, a devoted environmentalist, as the next chairman. In 1992, even before the founder died, his foundation began giving large annual grants for a Fisheries Action Network to challenge the fishing industry. The Fisheries Action Network was quickly joined in its efforts by the American Farmland Trust, which purchases farmland from distressed owners and re-sells it to the government.

All three daughters now sit on the Packard Foundation board of directors, and endorse huge anti-technology programs.

Packard Foundation Leadership 2016:

Links take you to the Muckety Bio of each key leader of the foundation:

Controversies

Questionable funding efforts

Packard funded a Union of Concerned Scientists study titled, Logging Off: Mechanisms to Stop or Prevent Industrial Logging in Forests of High Conservation Value. The study used subjective terms such as “biodiversity hotspots,” “frontier forests” and “critical ecoregions” to justify campaigns to end logging in virtually any forest with commercial timber. The Big Game Fishing Journal condemned Packard for being “instrumental in closing 40,000 square miles to fishing on the West Coast designating sections as Marine Protection Areas.”

Packard also funds the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA) to stop any human use of areas far beyond the state of Utah, noting in its materials that, “[t]o many energy developers, off-road riders and county commissioners in its home state, SUWA has become a four-letter word.” The materials go on to reason that concerns over the SUWA stem from the program having “kept oil and gas drilling, off-roading, and other mechanized activities out of some of the most rugged and remote parts of the lower 48,” which SUWA treats as its private domain with Packard money. (Source: The Writing on the Wall,” Packard Foundation, 2011.)

Packard funded the efforts of Jane Lubchenco, a noted marine scientist with dreams of a “new social compact” to convert impartial scientists into dogmatic advocates with policy goals, efforts that led to her appointment by President Obama to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where she regulated the New England fishing fleet nearly out of existence. Massachusetts Democrats. Reps. Barney Frank and John Tierney and Senator Scott Brown (R-MA) called upon President Obama to fire Lubchenco in 2011, but he refused.

Packard also took the highly questionable step of joining a “partnership” of left-leaning foundations that created a collaborative money funnel, the Energy Foundation. Among the many projects Packard funded through the Energy Foundation, the most remarkable involved the export of millions of American dollars to form Energy Foundation China to organize a collaboration between environmental groups and the top government regulatory officials of the People’s Republic of China.

Policy Power Projects

1998 was a landmark year for the David and Lucile Packard Foundation with two major entries into the political policy arena:

  • Packard joined the consortium of foundations that comprised the money funneling Energy Foundation with a $725,000 grant for “Support for work to develop the Packard China Energy Program,” the first of more than $70 million in Packard grants funneled to climate policy activists.
  • And Packard began a long and powerful relationship with marine biology Professor Jane Lubchenco with a generous grant to her Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, which was described as “Leadership and Communication Training for Science-Advocates,” precursor of the wholesale corruption of government scientists and the journalists who trained them to be persuasive mouthpieces for the lockstep “consensus” of climate catastrophists.

Jane Lubchenco came to Packard’s attention in 1997, during her term as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In a speech, she called on fellow scientists to join her in a new “social contract” in which scientists must promote their ideas to politicians and the public in order to create a world that is “ecologically sound, economically feasible and socially just.” The Packard directors and top staff were interested in the concept.

Jane Lubchenco received her PhD and taught at Harvard University. She won a MacArthur “genius grant” Fellowship ($625,000 over 5 years), a Pew Fellowship ($150,000 over 3 years), and the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement ($200,000). She was a past president of the Ecological Society of America and a professor of marine biology at Oregon State University. With two other past presidents of the ESA, Lubchenco planned how to put her new social contract into action as the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, which was never incorporated as an independent organization, with an initial Packard Foundation grant of $1,437,940.

Aldo Leopold Leadership Program sessions were designed for scientists who had realized that they lacked the skills to cope with mass media exposure or to face policymakers and were ready for training to use their scientific expertise to influence public policy.

Early seminars provided young environmentally focused scientists, such as Pew Marine Fellows, to attend Lubchenco’s lectures with titles including, “Advice for Scientists Asked to Comment in the Media.” She warned that “Controversy is the price of admission in science – but even more so in the public communication of science…. Outside of academia, controversy is much more public, and the judges and juries often don’t understand the history of the issues or the nuances of the science. Opposing views are usually given equal weight. Uncertainty is seen as a reason to tune out or continue with business as usual.”

“Think about who your audience is – in this case, the public, not scientists…. Think about your neighbor or a relative. Address why they should care and what matters to them. Focus on the big picture. Don’t get bogged down in the minor details… help the public and policymakers understand the broader context and where there is consensus.”

The program became an almost instant success and quickly began to hire journalists to give practical sessions, conduct role playing scenarios, and share advice on how to best attract media attention. Building on the project’s success, Lubchenco co-founded two more important science advocate training organizations: Sea Web and Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea (COMPASS), in 1999.

Sea Web

In 1999, SeaWeb officially became recognized as an independent IRS 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with Jane Lubchenco on the board of directors and veteran public relations executive Vikki Spruill as executive director. SeaWeb had been created in 1995 as a marine conservation initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts, which conducted public opinion polls on ocean conservation to raise the profile of the issue. In 1998, SeaWeb and NRDC launched the “Give Swordfish a Break” campaign, an effort to mobilize chefs and consumers to stop buying the North Atlantic swordfish.

After the spin-off from Pew, the Pew Memorial Trust gave SeaWeb a seed grant of $567,000 and Packard gave an initial grant of $1.2 million, with much more subsequently. SeaWeb paid Fenton Communications regular amounts of $144,000-plus for publicity. The program changed to Lubchenco’s training concept, stated in its IRS exempt purpose, “to enhance communication between the professional fields of marine science and conservation policy.”

Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea (COMPASS)

COMPASS, founded in 1999, is the brainchild of Packard-funded ocean scientists and communication professionals: Jane Lubchenco, Vikki Spruill (SeaWeb president), Chuck Savitt (Island Press president), Julie Packard and Chris Harrold (Monterey Bay Aquarium directors) and Jeannie Sedgewick and Mike Sutton (Packard Foundation program officers). Packard gave COMPASS a $1.7 million startup grant and $3.3 million in 2002 for its 5-year plan to hire professional journalists to train scientists to be policy advocates.